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Climate change: a people problem and a people solution

We are getting increasingly concerned over climate change, or so the most recent research suggests. Needless to say, we are aligning our personal convictions and civic action accordingly…right? Not necessarily. In recent elections across the world, significant numbers cast their vote on policies that downplay or outright ignore the need to address climate change. What is going on here?

It’s time to change your mind on things – literally

They called it “literally impossible” – an unachievable ambition for any human to outrun the 4-minute mile. If there was any hope in even attempting such a feat, conditions would have to be absolutely perfect: the track hard and dry, the temperature exactly 20 degrees Celsius; a windless day with tens of thousands of spectators to cheer you over the line. But it’s impossible, don’t forget, so why would you even try?

War for talent: Cease fire!

In 1997, McKinsey declared a War for Talent. Since then the world hasn’t let us forget it. In an economy where capital is abundant, competition is globally fierce, and iteration moves at the pace of lightning, they argue, “all that matters is talent. Talent wins.” As the job pool increasingly shallows in the digital economy, the battle for smart, technologically savvy, intuitive and operationally agile people with strong people leadership skills will only get bloodier. Add to this reality a widening skills gap in today’s workforce, and the effort to lock down the industry’s ‘best and brightest’ is even more intense. To survive disruption and thrive within the volatile and ever-changing world of business and workforce, McKinsey made it abundantly clear: to get what you want, you’ll have to engage in full frontal attack.

Will data save the day?

Big data is a big mystery these days. On one end, technology and its spectacular advancements has been touted as humanity’s royal flush for the 21st century – a trick hand to leapfrog our own extinction and win the future. On the other end, the idea of an ever-expanding, data-driven matrix could be kind of scary – okay, very scary – and may even resurrect a rather gloomy mood, with grey scale apocalyptic imagery on replay.

Leave room for humans!

Chemotherapy – the invaluable treatment that has saved countless lives of cancer patients through blocking different functions in cell growth and replication – stemmed from the discovery, during World War II, that exposure to mustard gas in conflict significantly reduced soldiers’ white blood cell count, sometimes fatally. The compound nitrogen mustard was studied further by researchers and found to halt the growth of rapidly dividing cells such as cancer cells. This is just one example of humankind adapting a negative discovery into a positive one.

Leaders go last in today’s world

Leaders are leaders, not because they declare it, but because they live it. They never wear it as a badge, but bear it daily as a great responsibility.

An ode to the ordinary

In today’s fast-paced world full of shiny new technology, there seems to be little for the mundane. How do we make the ordinary extraordinary?

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Just imagine

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